David Element

 

Wildlife Photography and Digital Video Images

 

__________________________________________________________________________ Butterflies 2 White Admirals

 

 

 

A close up of a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A picture containing animal, bird, small, sitting

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A close up of a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A insect on a branch

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A close up of a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A insect on the grass

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla

 

A close up of a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla ab. obliterae (extreme form)

 

A picture containing outdoor, bird, small, green

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla ab. obliterae (extreme form)

 

A insect standing on a rocky beach

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla ab. nigrina

 

A close up of a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla ab. nigrina

 

A insect on a flower

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WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY Limenitis camilla ab. nigrina

 

 

         White Admiral Butterflies Limenitis camilla can be frustrating subjects to photograph as they are easily disturbed and rarely stay still for long. Often a typical sighting will be of one of these butterflies investigating Bramble Rubus sp. blossoms and then soaring skywards into the branches of the nearest Oak Quercus sp. as the photographer approaches. They are particularly active during the heat of the day and the best chances for close views seem to arise when the butterflies are feeding late in the afternoon when they may become more settled or if they come to the ground to suck up essential salts, often from noxious substances in much the same manner as other nymphalids. Early mornings may also be productive. These other nymphalids include the larger and very splendid Purple Emperor Apatura iris (illustrated elsewhere on this site) with which they will often share a woodland habitat. White Admirals sometimes show variations in the extent of their white markings associated with the exposure of the early stages to extreme temperatures and two recognised aberrations are shown above, a form of ab. obliterata with much reduced white bands and ab. nigrina with just small ill-defined areas of pale scales on the uppersides and very beautifully marked undersides. These butterflies will rarely remain in a pristine state for long after emergence as their wings may be snagged by Bramble thorns or by failed attempts by insectivorous birds to catch them. The larval foodplant is Common Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum.

 

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David Element